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Books

Back To Square One

Conversations with Sabyasachi Guha
and Friends in India, Switzerland
and United States

Guha talks with the Mother of God

Conversations with Luna Tarlo
and others.

Paripurno Astha

Conversations with friends in the United States and
Kolkata from 2011 to 2014.

Luna Tarlo's unabridged Introduction

Guha talks with the Mother of God.

Dialogues

Thought Destroys the
Rhythm of Life

Conversations with Friends,
New York.

Type of file:PDF

Length:46 pages

Uploaded:2015-03-22

Dangerous to Ponder

Conversations with Friends,
New York.

Type of file:PDF

Length:26 pages

Uploaded:2014-01-01

Life Discards Everything

Conversations with Sabyasachi Guha
and Friends in India, Switzerland
and United States

Type of file:PDF

Length:14 pages

Uploaded:2013-02-12

Anything to Storytelling?

Conversations with Friends, New York.

Type of file:PDF

Length:14 pages

Uploaded:2013-01-14

Road to Insanity

Conversations with Friends. New York.

Type of file:PDF

Length:15 pages

Uploaded:2012-08-24

There is Nothing to Defend

Conversations with Friends.

Can’t Lose a Friend I Don’t Have

Conversations with Friends.
Palm Springs.

You is a Camouflage

Dialogue with a Friend. New Jersey.

All Solutions are Fictitious

Conversations with Friends. New Jersey.

Back To Square One

“Back To Square One” is comprised of conversations between Sabyasachi Guha and friends in India, Switzerland and the United States from 2012—2014. It offers us a unique glimpse of Guha’s many-sided personality: His extraordinary sensitivity and tremendous integrity and compassion, his sharp penetrating intellect and a deep and thorough understanding of the complexity of human nature.

The book also covers the deep implications of the physical and transformative impact of his close association with U.G. Krishnamurti. Guha was convinced that a personality like U.G. was very rare and comes around only once in a lifetime. His all-consuming desire was to immerse his mind and body fully in the powerful energy field that U.G. seemed to generate, the after-effects which he experienced as “love bordering on madness.”

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Guha talks with the Mother of God

Sabyasachi Guha, who was closely associated with U.G. Krishnamurti, and Luna Tarlo, longtime friend and author of the popular book Mother of God engage in intense dialogues on a wide range of topics, mostly addressing our main concerns of everyday living, the complexity of human individuals and the inner battles we face as a result of society’s relentless demands. Guha Talks With the Mother of God is the outcome of their informal conversations recorded in New York City during the period 2010–2012.

Luna, who is in her nineties, lives by herself in New York City. With his refreshingly candid humor, Guha tells her, “You have lived ninety years on this planet. You are a champion of the human species. How many people in the whole history of humanity from day one have survived this long, walked on two feet, lived independently, gone to the gym several times a week and engaged passionately in discussing human conflicts, sorrows, and the resolution! If you don’t smile, then humanity is doomed!”

A retired physicist, Guha delights in describing himself as a dropout from social dynamics, as someone who is homeless and godless. He says there is no such thing as love, truth, god or enlightenment and adds there is “no way out” of our suffering. Nevertheless, people continue to seek him out with “burning questions” and Guha is always gracious and forthright in his responses without imposing his point of view on anyone.

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Paripurno Astha

A collections of Guha’s words taken from conversations with friends in the United States and Kolkata from 2011 to 2014.

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LunaTarlo-unabridged

I met Guha for the first time in 1995 at a gathering in Julie’s apartment on Central Park West. A mix of people had come to see U.G. who was staying for a time in New York as her guest. Although she offered him much more spacious accommodations, he always chose to occupy the tiny room that had been originally designed as a “maid’s room.” U.G.
preferred small places to big ones. He was the most unpretentious, brilliant, unorthodox, mysterious person I had ever met. I was afraid of him. I think most people who met him were afraid of him because he was not like anyone else -- a man who asked for nothing from anyone and gave his all. On that late afternoon sixteen years ago, I observed a youngish Indian fellow sitting next to U.G. on the couch, laughing with delight at U.G.’s remarks. I had never seen him before, but he seemed to be thoroughly enjoying U.G.’s company. From then on, every time I came to see U.G., he was always there too, sitting in front of him and laughing incessantly.

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Thought Destroys the Rhythm of Life

Sabyasachi Guha, who spent a lifetime trying “to find out the meaning and purpose of life”, was compelled to meet U.G. Krishnamurti in 1995 after being deeply shaken by reading Mind Is A Myth. For Guha, this was the beginning of an intense, close and pivotal association that lasted until U.G.’s death in 2007. Right from day one U.G.’s proximity created irreversible physical changes in Guha and U.G.’s constant negation brought about the dissolution of thought-induced myths and beliefs, freeing
him from conflict for good: “The system now stands in a place that does not have to imagine its own existence.”

In Thought Destroys the Rhythm of Life Guha reminds us that our physical system has tremendous innate intelligence and left to its own device without the imposition of thoughts and ideas will fall into its natural, harmonious rhythm. He says that the conflict in each one of us arises out of the movement of wanting to know “how” to achieve an imaginary ideal state. “True beginning of intelligence is the realization that anything we think or do to achieve that state will never address our total wellbeing”.

Guha cuts to the core of our existential problems and encourages us to challenge our preconceptions, attitudes and beliefs. He tells us to give importance to only that which is vital and functioning in our lives. “Out of this process something can emerge, which is not a belief; it is an overall confidence in the system itself.” Lastly, Guha asks us to recognize the “dead end” signpost of helplessness and sums up succinctly: “Hope is in deeply honest hopelessness.”

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Dangerous to Ponder


For Sabyasachi Guha, the functionality of U.G. Krishnamurti became an obsession from the first day he met him in 1995. He earnestly and intensely sought to understand the difference between the way U.G. functioned and the way most of us live our lives. In Dangerous to Ponder, he addresses questions such as “What evidence do we have that the way U.G. functioned was radically different from the way we function?” “Why did U.G. deny the legitimacy of religious and spiritual beliefs?” “What did U.G. mean when he said that the “natural state” he found himself in was acausal?”

Guha also examines the futility of knowledge to resolve conflict, our tendency to create myth and its negative ramifications on the physical body, the interesting observation that the biological mechanism used to protect the physical body uses the same mechanism to safeguard the person against psychological fear, the advantages and limitations of the “parallel world” and its functional value, and the
true meaning of renunciation.

To those who seriously seek the meaning and purpose of life, Guha’s words are shocking to hear and difficult to uphold. He offers no hope, says there is no such thing as love, truth God, or enlightenment and no way out of the misery we face in our daily living. Guha insists there is nothing to get from him or from anyone and that ultimately what we seek is freedom from psychological conditioning brought about by society’s constant demands.

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Life Discards Everything

In this talk, Sabyasachi Guha, who was closely associated with U.G. Krishnamurti for over a decade, gives deep insights into the “natural order of the body” which, he says, is our true freedom. Guha adds that this natural order, which is innate in every individual, cannot be brought about by the intellect but can unfold only through complete trust. Paradoxically, any effort on our part to bring about this order inhibits the natural process of its emergence.

In Life Discards Everything Guha starts with describing the natural order which he has expounded systematically and in great detail in his Bengali book In the Company of U.G. — 14 Days in Palm Springs and goes on to narrate the pivotal and life-changing relationship he had with U.G.

An excerpt from In the Company of U.G. — 14 Days in Palm Springs sums up in Guha’s own words the beauty of the natural order:

“Each one of us is a unique creation of nature and an incomparable movement. A great intelligence is continuously working to maintain this living movement and its equilibrium with the external world. If somehow a “complete trust” – in Bengali we call it “paripurno astha” – develops in us, the naturally induced order, pre-programmed at birth, will begin to unfold. Life then begins to function in a very different way. The internal power that is associated with the pre-programmed order is so far beyond our
imagination that its exhibition and its far-reaching effects are incomprehensible. All that you need to move in the field of living is naturally supplied by that power, the power that comes out of that order.”

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Life Discards Everything

Sabyasachi Guha first met U.G. Krishnamurti in 1995 in New York. Right from the onset U.G. had a powerful and physical affect on him which continued throughout their association till U.G.’s death in 2007. Guha describes some of the experiences as extremely uncomfortable and uncontrollable processes, like being “visited by the messenger of death.” He later realized that U.G. was serious when he remarked, “You wouldn’t touch this with a ten-foot barge pole.” As Guha continued to spend time with U.G., he underwent a radical, irreversible physical transformation:

“I have turned into a two-legged animal with a peculiar order, and it does not want to be anywhere or spend time with anybody if it has to compromise that order.”

Moving, honest and confronting, Guha and friends share their experiences of their interactions with U.G. Krishnamurti and the various aspects of the understandings that subsequently unfolded.

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Life Discards Everything

Sabyasachi Guha, author of In the Company of U.G. Krishnamurti—14 Days in Palm Springs (Bengali) and translator of U.G. Krishnamurti, A Life by Mahesh Bhatt into Bengali (originally translated for his mother), invites us to embrace our uniqueness and to trust the dynamic processes which keep us alive and functioning so that the “‘nature-induced order” pre-programmed at birth can unfold.

In Road to Insanity, Guha covers such issues as the relationship between “lapse of time and space” and creative output, the importance of complete focus to penetrate deep into the unconscious for answers, the purpose of self-aggrandizement and its origin, misconceptions about “choiceless awareness” as propagated by J Krishnamurti, the natural response of “attraction as the action” versus thought- induced attraction cultivated by culture and the effects of the continuous movement of thinking on the physical body.

From a young age, Guha was spurred by a passionate yearning to understand his own nature and in the process became well versed in the traditional Indian scriptures, including mythology, mysticism and spiritual and yogic practices such as meditation and hatha yoga. Although he says he had many phenomenal spiritual experiences, none of these helped to resolve his inner conflicts. It wasn’t until he met U.G. Krishnamurti in 1995 that a major shift occurred and ended his seeking once and for all.

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There is Nothing to Defend

Sabyasachi Guha describes U.G. Krishnamurti as someone who functioned in a harmonious, dynamic equilibrium with society’s relentless pressures and demands; he had no investment in any concepts or ideas and was not defending anyone or anything. Guha insists that we too can function similarly, that it is our birthright and what we truly seek.

With his usual exuberance and focus, in There is Nothing to Defend Guha discusses the complexity of thought as a myth-making machine at the expense of the body. He says thoughts are necessary for us to function sanely and intelligently in the world but within limits. The outgrowth of social justification has resulted in sophisticated and complex ways for the thinking structure to continue its onslaught on the physical body causing undue stress and harm. To rectify the imbalance and establish the pre- the programmed order is a “violent process” and cannot be brought about by the intellect:

“It’s almost like dying. In fact, it is a death. It’s a process that makes you feel that you
will never open your eyes again.”

Guha poses a challenging dilemma which seems to indicate that there is no solution. “As long as you are using that instrument called thinking—and there is no other instrument—you are demanding something, which is a constant energy drain on the system.” Nonetheless, his words inspire us to stand alone and to explore our own notions of truth and reality.

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Can’t Lose a Friend I Don’t Have

Sabyasachi Guha, retired physicist, met U.G. Krishnamurti in 1995 and remained in close association with him until U.G’s death in 2007. In U.G. he felt he had finally met the person who was able to address his inner conflicts and end his seeking once and for all.

In Can’t Lose A Friend I Don’t Have Guha addresses the concept of Advaita Vedanta and explains its stark non-reality.

“The model is an assumption and the reporting mechanism itself a divisive process. These are concepts and they come to us through intellectual and logical thinking, therefore it is always problematic. How do we address the oneness of life? One can not say, “I have experienced non-duality.” By trying to understand the concept one will invest tremendously in the dualistic nature of thought and imagination, and in the process of trying to understand the experience logically, create ideas and various
aspects of Advaita.”

“If you attempt to imitate a behavior about a particular state and try to prove you are functioning accordingly, you will fool yourself and mislead others.”

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You is a Camouflage

Sabyasachi Guha, who moved closely with U.G. Krishnamurti for more than a decade, encourages us to trust that everything we need to function in equilibrium with the external world is naturally supplied by the internal power that comes out of the “natural order”, innate in all individuals, waiting to be activated. You Is a Camouflage was inspired by a key passage from Guha’s Bengali book, In the Company of U.G. Krishnamurti—14 Days in Palm Springs which systematically expounds the “natural order”.

Guha was determined to understand, from both a spiritual and scientific perspective, why he was so powerfully affected by U.G. whose functionality appeared to be the outcome of a “natural process”. However, he was soon convinced that it was an exercise in total futility, the main pitfall being there was no direct correlation to what was unfolding inside him and the use of language to communicate it.

“It can’t be explained or conveyed, therefore it’s of no use to anyone, nor can it be given or taken. It is deep down, unknowable for me.”

Guha does not promote any religious concepts or spiritual doctrines. In fact, he dismisses them all as pure fiction born out of imagination. He unequivocally states that information-gathering and knowledge only help us to function sanely and intelligently in the world. The rest is up to Mother Nature.

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You is a Camouflage

Sabyasachi Guha, who was closely associated with U. G. Krishnamurti, questions the validity of Jiddu Krishnamurti’s teachings and exposes some of the misconceptions in All Solutions are Fictitious. He also discusses the mechanics of thought as a pleasure movement, the futile never-ending cycle of replacing one idea with another, primary and secondary consciousness as a survival mechanism as well as the body’s intelligent self-organization using the examples of the brain and the immune system to bring the physical body to a healthy equilibrium.

Guha never fails to remind us that knowledge has its limitations and no amount of information about the processes of the body and its activities can prepare us to respond to life’s situations.

To listen to Guha speak is to profoundly encounter oneself with the recognition that he is addressing our true wellbeing:

“To get to the foundation of a problem you have to come to a place where you are confronted with yourself. Your capacity, how badly you want to know or your intensity will bring some action. When you put all your passion into one channel, you will see things a certain way. Many other things will fall off, because that is the most important thing for you. It addresses the core problem, not a nonfunctional, hopeful, fictitious solution mixed with a dose of high producing mythical future.”

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